April and May Wildflowers

 

 

Phot (click on image to see larger format picture) Description  Date

Coltsfoot: found along the roads.  The name is based on the similarity of the shape of the leaf to a horse's hoof. This is a non-native plant introduced from Eurasia.  In some places this is considered an invasive species.

Reference: Paul Smith's

Photo: AF

4/29

Purple Trillium: also known as Red Trillium, Wake-robin, or Stinking Benjamin or Stinkpot.  The latter two names is derived from their smell which is like rotting flesh.  Carrion flies that feed on the thawing flesh of dead animals are attracted to Trillium and are crucial in their pollination. This is a native plant to the east and north-east.

Trilliums appear before the forest canopy comes out in full.  They take advantage of early spring sun.  

Reference: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photos: AF, DC and SM 

5/4
 

Hobblebush:  a native deciduous shrub.  In early spring the plant produces clusters of white flowers.  By August, the plant produces red berries.  The name is derived from the fact that the low spreading branches of the plant can easily trip or hobble an unsuspecting hiker.

Reference: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photos: AF and DC

5/9  
 
 

Fiddlehead Ferns: are the furled fronds of a young fern.  These are a popular spring vegetable.  The name is derived from the similarity of the plant to the scroll ornamentation of a string instrument like a fiddle.

Reference: Wikipedia

Photo: AF 

 
 5/9

Wild Oats: the narrow bell like shape of this pale yellow flower that hangs from a drooping branch has given this plant the alternative name of Little Merrybells. Sessile Bellwort is another common name.

References: McGrath, p.77; Chapman et al., p. 90.


Photo: AF

5/9
 

Painted Trillium:  also known as Painted Lady. Each flower has three lance shaped white petals and purplish stripe in its center. Each plant will have three, blue green leaves. In late summer or early fall, the plant will produce bright red fruit. 

References: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photo: DC

 
5/15 
   

Jack in the Pulpit: The most characteristic element is the  upright, curved spathe ("the Pulpit") that encloses a club shaped spadix ("Jack").  The plant has large trifoliate leaves.  By the end of the summer red, clustered berries  will appear on the spadix.

WikipediaLady Bird Wlidflower Center

Photo: AF, CG, & DC

 
5/17  
 
      

Forget me nots: Introduced from Europe, this species is naturalized now around lakes, ponds, and streams. The Forget me not appears in European folklore and legend.

Reference: Wikipedia

Photo: AF, DC, LL, and BM

  5/17    
 
 
 

 Pinxter buds are about to blossom.

Photo: AF

 
5/17 
 

Starflower: Also known as the Northern Starflower and Maystar.  It is a woodland perennial, especially found in northern New York. 

References: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Photo: AF

 
5/18 
 

Pink Lady's Slipper or Mocassin Flower: about to bloom.

 

Photo: DC 

5/18 

Velvet-Leaf Blueberry:

clusters of white, waxy, tubular flowers appear on this shrub found in moist soils like swamps. 

 

Reference: Chapman et al., p.36

Photo: DC

5/19
 

Pinxter (in bloom):  this azalea stands out in late May and early June with its abundance of sweet smelling pink flowers. 

Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photo: SM, DC & LL

   
 5/20
 
 
 

Lily of the Valley: the plant bears dainty, white bell-shaped flowes with a strong, sweet perfume. Given the right conditions this plant can be an agressive groundcover.

All parts of this plant are highly poisonous.

Reference: WikipediaCornell Growing Guide.

Photo: SM & AF

  
5/20  
 
 

Pink Lady's Slipper: also called Moccasin Flower or Stemless Orchid, the Lady's Slipper is a member of the orchid family. Grows in acid woods, oak and pine forests and bogs.  The plant has two opposite basal leaves with prominent parallel veins and a leafless stalk bearing the distinctive pink flower. 

The plant has difficulty propagating and should not be picked.  The plant takes many years to develop from seed to mature plant which can live to twenty years or more.

Reference: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photos: SM, LL, & DC

   
 5/20
 
 
 
 

Wild Columbine: a member of the buttercup family, the plant is characterized by its distinctive, drooping red and yellow flowers.  Distinctive of the plant is its three, lobed leaves.The genus name, Aqulegia, is derived from the Latin word aquila, or eagle.  The flower's backward pointing tubes have a shape similar to that of the talons of an eagle.Reference: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. 

 

Photos: SM and CK  

5/20  
 
 

Violets:

 

Photos: SM & LL  

5/20  
 
 

Mayapple:  also known as Indian Apple or Wild mandrake. The plant is distinctive for its 2 leaves and single flower.  The large, twin leaves are umbrella-like.  The single, nodding flower has 6-9 white petals.  The name is derived from similarity of the flower to apple blossoms.

Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photos: RC& DC 

5/20  
 

Bluets: Also known as Quaker Ladies, these delicate perennial plants grow in large tufts and can cover large areas.  The pale blue flowers have a yellow center. Bluets are known to bloom in early May at the lake.

Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Photo: LL

 5/21
 

Chokecherry:

Photo: DC

 
 
   

Two-Leaved Toothwort:  also known as the Crinkleroot and Pepperwort, this plant is found in rich moist woods.  A cluster of white or light pink, four petaled blossoms appear at the end of a stem rising above the leaves.

Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center;

 

Photo: AF

5/23 

White or Large Flowered Trillium: grows in rich moist woodlands.  The usually white flower is formed by three large petals.  These petals turn pink when the flower matures.

Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

 

Photo: DC

5/24

Canada Violets:


Photo: MA

5/24

Wild Strawberry:  also known as the Virginia Strawberry.  This perennial has stalk which at first bears a white, five-petaled flower that will become a tasty wild strawberry.

 

References: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

 

Photo: AF

 5/23
   

Ajuga reptans: commonly known as bugleweed or carpetweed, is a dense, rapidly spreading, mat-forming ground cover. This is a non-indigenous plant that is native to Europe, northern Africa, and southwstern Asia.  It is used as a ground cover in areas where lawns are difficult to grow.  

References: Missouri Botanical GardenWikipedia.

Photo: AF

 5/24
 

Marsh Marigolds: this perennial with heart shaped leaves produces shiny yellow flowers in showy spring display.  The plant is native to marshes, swamps, and the margins of ponds and streams.  

References: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower CenterMissouri Botanical Garden

Photo: DC

 
5/24 
 

False Solomon's Seal: also known as Feathery False Lily of the Valley, False Spikenard, and Solomon's Plume. False Solomon's Seal is distinguished with its small, white blossoms at the tip of the single arching stem. Elipitical leaves, alternate along the central stem.

The spotted berries that develop from the flower clusters turn a ruby-red in the fall.  

 Reference: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center; wildeherb.com

Photo: AF

 
 5/24
 

Foamflower: also known as Heartleaf Foamflower, this plant bears small, white feathery flowers at the end of a leafless stalk. 

References: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson's Wildflower Center.

Photo: AF

 
5/24 
 

Wild Sarsaparilla: also known as False Sarsaparilla, Shot Bush, Small Spikenard, Wild Licroice, and Rabbit Root.  In spring, the plant produces tiny greenish white flowers in globe shaped clusters. The flowers later develop into purple-black berries. Its roots can be substituted for true Sarsaparilla to make root beer.

References: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

 

Photo: BM 

 
 5/25
   

Canada Mayflower (Wild Lily of the Valley): also known as the False Lily of the Valley. The plant has two, shiny oval leaves with a central stem with a cluster of small, white flowers.  The plant will produce small, pale red berries.  


References: Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center;

Photo: LL

 
     

Bunchberry: Found in cool moist woods, this plant often forms large colonies.  It is also called Ground Dogwood or Dwarf Cornel.  Red berries produced by the plant appear in mid to late summer.

References:  Paul Smith'sLady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

 

Photo: LL, DC & BM

 

 5/25  
 
 
 

Clintonia: Clintonia grows in cool moist woods and attracts great numbers of Yellow Swallowtail butterflies. In mid-summer flowers give way to large dark blue berries. Thus the name Bluebeard Lily is also used for this plant. The name was given to the plant to honor DeWitt Clinton, a former governor of New York.

(Yellow Swallowtail Butterflies were observed 5/25)

References: Paul Smith's;  Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photo: LL

 
 5/25
   Deerflies: They're back!  They seem early this year.  5/26
 

Honeysuckle: 


Photo: DC.

 
5/28 
 

A Dandelion with an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly.

Photo: DC

5/29 
 

Foxglove plant:

Photo: AF

 
 5/29
  Hobblebush Berries have formed.   5/30
 

White Baneberry: this perennial plant is native to eastern North America.  The white flowers are produced in spring.  The plant will produce berries that will ripen over the summer and produce its characteristic white berry that give the plant its common name "doll's eyes".

Both the berries and the plant are considered poisonous to humans.  The berries have cardiogenic toxins which have a sedative effect on the human cardiac muscle.

References: WikipediaMissouri Botanical Garden.

Photo: DC

 
 5/30
     
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CLCA News & Events 7/4/2017

July 4th Water Level Update

As of 7AM July 4, lake level at Green Lake Bridge was 13 inches above summer normal, and down 9 inches over past 24 hours. 
The DEC opened the dam to 22 inches on the morning of July 3, after opening it to 10 inches on July 2. At present rate, normal lake level is expected by late Thursday July 6.
Bill Fielding, on behalf of the CLCA, urged DEC on July 1 to open the dam 22 to 25 inches. A further urgent request was made at 7AM on July2 and DEC opened the dam to 10 inches that afternoon.
At 6PM on July 2 CLCA again asked DEC to open to 20 inches, and then at 7AM on July 3 upped the recommended opening to 22 inches. DEC finally opened the dam to that level at approximately 9AM July 3.
Further updates will be sent if warranted.
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