June Wildflowers

 

 

     
Photo (click on image to see larger format picture)          Description Date

Dame's Rocket (commonly called Phlox): in late May and early June this plant flourishes along the sides of our roads and in open fields.  Frequently mistaken for the native Phlox plant, Dame's Rocket is non-native introduced from Europe.  Phlox has five petaled flowers, while Dame's Rocket's flowers have four petals.  The plant has a high number of seeds and thus crowds out native plants.  The plant should be considered to be an invasive. Massachusetts and Connecticut prohibit or ban this plant. (Thanks to Debbie Correll and Jane Davis for correcting this frequent confusion.)

References: Chapman et al., p. 50; USDA

 

Photo: DC

6/4
 

Wild Perennial Lupine (Sundial Lupone, Indian Beet, or Old Maid's Bonnet) : there are over 200 species of Lupines.  A member of the legume family, seeds of lupines have been a food source for over 3000 years in the Mediterranean area and 6000 years in the Andes.


The Pinxter and Lily of the Valley are waning.

References:  Lady Bird Johnson Wild Flower Center; Wikipedia (general); Wikpedia (lupinus perennis)


Photo: DC

  
6/6 
 
 

Strawberries are ready for picking! 

 

Photo: DC.

6/9 

Yellow Hawkweed:

Photo: AF

6/9

Orange Hawkweed or Devil's Paintbrush: a European import, Orange Hawkweed has spread rapidly in fields, clearings, and along roadsides.  This rapid spread lead farmers to call the plant Devil's Paintbrush and to be considered one of the most notorious "weeds."  By the end of June the orange flowers become fuzzy clusters of seed. There are native and alien species of hawkweed.  A major difference is that the leaves of native plants ascend the plant wihile the leaves of the alien species have a rosette pattern at the base (basal). Picked flowers quickly close up and wilt.


Photos: AF, JB, and LL

 

6/9 

Chickweed: introduced from Europe and is now common throughout North America.


References: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center; Ohio Perennial & Birnnial Weed Guide.

Photo: LL

6/9

Common Buttercup, Meadow Buttercup, or Tall Buttercup (Ranunculus acris): probably introduced from Eurasia, this has become widespread throughout the U.S..  The plant can be found in a wide range of habitats including wet lowlands, woodlands, fields, and along roadsides.  

Reference: Ohio Perennial & Biennial Weed Guide.

 

Photos: AF

 
  6/9

Wintergreen: this low growing shrub is native to the Adirondacks and eastern North America.  The evergreen leaves have an oil with a wintergreen scent.  The brilliant red fruits are edible with a minty flavor.

Sources: Paul Smith's


Photo: LL

6/9
 

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies: this species of swallowtail butterfly is one of the most famliar butterflies in the eastern U.S.  The male is yellow with four black "tiger stripes" on each forewing.  The female can be black or yellow. The yellow ones have evident blue spots along the back of the wing. The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is most evident in June and early July.  The name Swallowtail is based on the similarity of the butterfly's tail to that of a swallow.

 Reference: Wikipedia

Photos: LL  

6/9  
 

Pearl Crescent Butterfly: is found in all parts of the U.S. except the west coast.  It can be found in open areas such as pastures and roadsides.  The species has several broods and can be found from April to November in the north.

 Reference: Wikipedia

Photo: LL 

 6/9
 

 Bee with Red Clover:

 

Photo: LL 

 
 

Yellow Pond Lily (Spatterdock):  this native of the waters of the Adirondacks blooms in late spring and summer. The Spatterdock was a food source and was used medicinally by Native Americans.  

Reference: Paul Smith's

Photos: LL

 
6/10   
 
 
     
 

Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy, or English Daisy: the middle of June witnesses the blooming of Daisies and Queen Anne's Lace in fields and along the roadsides. Both are other European imports that have become naturalised in the U.S.

Reference: Wikipedia 

Photos: LL & AW

 

 6/10
 

Queen Anne's Lace or Wild Carrot: native to Europe and Asia, Queen Anne's Lace has become naturalized in North America.  It is not clear whether the name is in reference to Anne, Queen of England (reigned 1702-1707) or to her great grandmother Anne of Denmark (Queen Consort of England from 1603-1619).  

Reference: Wikipedia

 

Photo: AF

 6/10
 

Yellow Daylily or Lemon-Lily: this is the first daylily to bloom each year.  Daylilies are native to Asia.  Since the 1930s, a wide variety of hybrids have been introduced.  The most common types are the Yellow and Orange Daylilies which have "escaped" and are growing as if they are wild.

Reference: Daylilies

Photo: AF 

6/10 
 

Blue Flag Iris: this is a native iris of the Adirondacks. It appears in swampland and wet meadows. The flower depends on polination by bees.

References: Paul Smith's.; Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Photos: JB & LL

   
 6/13   
 
 
 
 

Common Wood Sorrel:The plant is native to eastern North America. The wood sorrel is a low-growing plant with clover-like foliage and several white or pink flowers, with only 1 flower per stalk.

 References: Paul Smith's; Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Photo: AF

 6/19
 

 Bladder Campion:


Photos: AF & LL

   
6/20   
 
 

Common Fleabane: 

 

Photo: AF

 6/20

Foxgloves:



Photo: SS

6/21
 

Sheep Laurel: is found in bogs and in moist wooodland soils.  This evergreen shrub has a cluster of deep pink flowers.  The flowers are similar to Bog Laurel except that the flowers on the latter appear at the top of the stem, while those of sheep laurel appear several inches below the top of the stem.

The plant is also called Lambkill since the foliage is poisonous to livestock.

Reference: Paul Smith's:


Photos: LL

 
6/20  
 
 

Wild Strawberries are ripe

 

Photo: JB

 6/22

Musk Mallow:


Photo: JB

6/22

Birdsfoot Trefoil:

 

Photo: LL

6/25

Spiderwort:


Photo:  LL

6/25
 

Dogbane: the name is derived from the plant's toxic nature, which is believed to be poisonous to dogs.  The plant is also known as Indian Hemp since weaving together the plants stems produced cordage.

The plants are relatives to milkweeds.  It was once thought that Dogbane was a larval food for Monarch Butterlies, but more recent research has shown that while adult female monarchs are attracted to the plant, their larval offspring will not mature on it.

 References:  Lady Bird Johnson's Wild Flower Center; Wikipedia.

Photo: BM 

 

6/25 
 

Pickerel Weed: 

 

Photos: LL

6/24 
     
     
     
     
     
 

Spatulate-leaved sundew 


Photo: MA

6/28
 

 Purple Pitcher Plant

Photo: MA& LL

 

 6/28
 

Rose Pogonia:

 

Photo: MA

6/28
 

Northern tubercled bog orchid:


Photos: MA

 
6/28  
 
     
     

 

     
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CLCA News & Events 7/4/2017

July 4th Water Level Update

As of 7AM July 4, lake level at Green Lake Bridge was 13 inches above summer normal, and down 9 inches over past 24 hours. 
The DEC opened the dam to 22 inches on the morning of July 3, after opening it to 10 inches on July 2. At present rate, normal lake level is expected by late Thursday July 6.
Bill Fielding, on behalf of the CLCA, urged DEC on July 1 to open the dam 22 to 25 inches. A further urgent request was made at 7AM on July2 and DEC opened the dam to 10 inches that afternoon.
At 6PM on July 2 CLCA again asked DEC to open to 20 inches, and then at 7AM on July 3 upped the recommended opening to 22 inches. DEC finally opened the dam to that level at approximately 9AM July 3.
Further updates will be sent if warranted.
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Local News 8/21/2017

What's Happening Monday, Aug. 21

Highlights include track giveaway, Restaurant Week...

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